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The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 03:33:10

An abandoned account
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Twenty years ago today, Jean-Marc Bosman won his case at the European Court of Justice. From that day on, when a footballer's contract expired, they were free to join any new club without their new club paying their old club a transfer fee and leagues in countries in the EU could no longer restrict the number of foreign players playing in their league.

More information: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bosman_ruling&oldid=682730268

Edited 12/15/2015 03:33:58
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 04:00:21


King C******* V
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Unreal.
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 04:24:33


[AOE] JaiBharat909
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Probably the single biggest reason why money dominates football. Agents have so much power and the bureaucratic fees involved in transfer deals are exorbitant and wasteful. Although you can't argue with the fact that it has resulted in the development of football as a true international support.

Edited 12/15/2015 04:24:46
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 12:23:51

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Probably the single biggest reason why money dominates football.


The Bosman ruing was a catalyst to big money in football, not the cause. It's the increasing money broadcasters are willing to pay to show matches on TV that's been the biggest cause of high wages and transfer fees.
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 12:46:13


Angry Koala
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Money in sports ruined it all, it is obvious things changed and it's totally insane to see people paid millions of euros just for kicking a ball around. This is because our current societies are mainly focused on entertainment, whereas they should be focused on education/sciences/technology.

It is clear they do not deserve this salary, the easy comparison to make is a genious in maths making crucial discoveries for mankind, and a talented football player playing for Real Madrid or MU (any top club), one question: who do you think earn the most?

I think the society had more sense before the 1950s, when people like Einstein, Newton or Marie Curie were heroes and respected, people playing sports as amateurs and not earning insane money but nonetheless lived decently. While now heroes are people kicking a ball around, kids take Benzema, CR7 or Ibrahimovich as God-like persons or icons. I chose those 3 players because they are shown as examples for the youth while they are among the worst human beings (particularly due to their behavior in society), ignorants and exarcebated egos and arrogance, now you understand better why our societies in their current state are doomed.

Edited 12/15/2015 12:50:45
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/15/2015 22:43:58

Belissa
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Reply to Angry Koala

You keep hearing people say why aren't doctors or X bla bla paid this amount of money. Or in your case mathematicians. It just a stupid argument and should cease to exist. It is not comparable to pro sports stars getting paid.
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/16/2015 08:45:06


Angry Koala
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Oh and then Belissa, their salary is justified? Stop dreaming, our society is currently decaying mainly because we focus to much on entertainment stuff not only sports. Another example of how crazy we are: People in the US achieving good results in sports are privileged compared to others and can afford to have almost free fees or join a very respectable university because they know how to kick a ball around, will you say this is normal?
The Bosman Ruling: 20 Years Later: 12/16/2015 12:14:58


Genghis 
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It's because all sports affiliates are just very huge industries.
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